A Brief Review of The Android Operating System

Starting with the basics – Android is a smart phone operating system with development spearheaded by Google. In fact the operating system is worked on by a variety of companies which fall under the umbrella title of the Open Handset Alliance. It’s is an exceedingly powerful smart phone operating system as it allows a large degree of customisation and app availability. It is essentially a software stack (backbone for an interface). Many companies develop their own graphical user interface for the Android backbone and this is why you will find that almost every smart phone that utilises Android has a different interface (albeit with a lot of the same functionality).

A Brief-Review of The Android Operating System

Ok, so the good – well it’s highly customisable. It also boasts a massive array of apps. Android doesn’t pull any punches in this regard as it has over 100,000 apps available for download. This is just one aspect of how customisable the phone is. The other is that the software is not locked to the phone as such, this allows the savvier of users to tweak the internals and add or subtract from the operating system itself. This is great for the technically minded folks out there but it leads to the one complaint I have about the Android operating system and that is it sometimes is a little daunting to new (or non-technically minded) users.

The only real problem with the Android operating system is this – with a massive array of customisability options many people are going to feel as though they are not in need of a phone with such advanced capabilities. However, this is hardly a problem if you consider how easy to use most Android phones are out of the box. Many of the companies who have picked up the Android backbone have tailored their interfaces to be fairly user friendly. While the Android interface when untouched is functional – it remains just that. It is not the most attractive interface to behold. Depending on the phone you use this is not always an issue however.

Android processes software fast as well, so there is not a lot of lag or jerkiness in many of the phones that I have tested. Many people may not be too worried about eye candy anyway. Most of us just want something that works – and Android works, quickly. Sure, the native Android interface is a little less user friendly when you first approach it, but it is not a very steep learning curve. Regardless of the phone, there is going to be some sort of learning curve and the Android probably has a slightly steeper learning curve than many of its competitors. Although once you master it you’ll be adding apps left, right and center.

So the Android operating system is good, no doubt about that. However for novice users you might want to spend some extra time on getting your head around the interface. It will pay off in the long term however because there are a massive array of apps available for download (over 100,000 at present).

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  • ben10ysun

    i’m trying to load adobe flash player on to my coby android,mid 7014 for the longest time now an i can’t seem to get it load, can you help me?

  • Philip

    Hi Neal
    I wonder if you could explain why each phone has to have its own version of each software update. Given that the Samsung Nexus is running a stable release of ICS, why is it that we cant just load that onto the Galaxy S2 i9100 ?
    After all its just a computer – I could load any OS there with no problems, what is different about these phones.
    thanks in advance
    Philip

    • http://www.amitbhawani.com/blog/ Amit Bhawani

      Each of them have different hardware and hence it cannot be running the ICS. We have posted a useful guide on upgrading your S II to ICS today.

  • TobyRich

    this looks good

  • leoanrd

    hi? can this application also work in samsung galaxy mini s5570? i also want to remove default applications in my cellphone.

  • Kurt Christensen

    Just as another observation. Advanced IP settings are globally applied, not specific to each hot-spot. The phone is not smart enough to remember this fixed IP for this network, and that fixed IP for that one. It does, however have the feature of falling back to a static configuration when DHCP fails.

  • Kurt Christensen

    Don’t get an android if you care anything at all about privacy.

    I have had this phone (Motorola Proton, Android 2.3) for a couple of weeks now. I’m just now getting the hang of things. My biggest complaint is that the on-line services keep trying to get into my knickers. You can’t even add a contact without identifying some on-line service to store it for you. How lame is that?

  • Leo Ethiopia

    I couldn’t install adobe flash player.
    Please advise me how to install it in to my Samsung galaxy mini?

    • http://twitter.com/pradeepneela NeaL Pradeep

      as of now it doesnt support the flash playeR!

  • Bluehost Review

    Android is one of the most customizable and best operating systems for mobiles, which has the great potential to beat the iOS by Apple.